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Repair/strengthen particleboard cabinet frame work - Epoxy??

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  • Repair/strengthen particleboard cabinet frame work - Epoxy??

    On my round-to-it list is fixing the interior frame where the vinyl has pealed inside some of my cabinets. I posted pictures of the damage which looks like water damage, but no trace of water is present. I want to seal (waterproof) and strengthen before I paint/stain. I have epoxy available - would it soak in and stabilize the particleboard, or should I use something else? The epoxy is the West system 105. Or should I stain first (water based?? or oil based??) let dry then seal with epoxy?

    Thanks for any thoughts?
    Keith
    2018 Reflection 150 Series 220RK 5th wheel. Reese R20 Titan hitch, Steadyfast system, 2004 F350 King Ranch dually

  • #2
    Originally posted by Yoda View Post
    I want to seal (waterproof) and strengthen before I paint/stain...
    Consider "painting" it with 2 or 3 coats of Titebond III waterproof glue. I've done that on MDF and it's amazing how the "treated" MDF stands up in the weather. If you buy the gallon-size, it's not that expensive, either.

    -Steve

    2018 Solitude 310GK, disc brakes
    Morryde CRE3000/XFactor with heavy duty shackles, V-Brackets in spring hangers
    2012 Ram 3500 SRW 6.7 Diesel, air bags
    18k B&W Companion, non-slider
    640 watts solar, 400 amp-hour Lion Safari UT 1300 battery bank
    Aims 1500 watt inverter/charger with ATS
    Blaine, MN

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    • #3
      Yoda

      Hi Keith,

      I don't have any experience with epoxy on particleboard, but can give you what I know after many gallons of West System used in all sorts of mahogany, teak and marine plywood fabrication. The epoxy does not sink in very far (might be different on particleboard) but is a very good surface bond method of attachment. As an example, when I bond two pieces of wood together and what squeezes out smears across the wood . . . after it cures, the smear sand off easily (it does not sink in).

      Epoxy does not like bonding to stained surfaces. Trying to use epoxy as a topcoat over stained wood does not usually go well.
      Sanding epoxy without additives is a tough job . . . it is hard stuff.

      My approach to this would be to use West 105 with "Lightweight Fairing Additive 407" on the bare particleboard. Add enough 407 to get to the consistency of thick paint. This retains the benefits of the epoxy waterproofing, will fill the roughness of the particleboard and gives you a surface that can be reasonably easily sanded and then painted.

      Rob
      Cate & Rob
      (with Border Collies Molly & Angel and their kitty Gracie)
      2015 Reflection 303RLS
      2014 Ecoboost F150 with Heavy Duty Payload Package
      Whitby, Ontario, Canada

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Cate&Rob View Post
        Yoda

        Hi Keith,

        I don't have any experience with epoxy on particleboard, but can give you what I know after many gallons of West System used in all sorts of mahogany, teak and marine plywood fabrication. The epoxy does not sink in very far (might be different on particleboard) but is a very good surface bond method of attachment. As an example, when I bond two pieces of wood together and what squeezes out smears across the wood . . . after it cures, the smear sand off easily (it does not sink in).

        Epoxy does not like bonding to stained surfaces. Trying to use epoxy as a topcoat over stained wood does not usually go well.
        Sanding epoxy without additives is a tough job . . . it is hard stuff.

        My approach to this would be to use West 105 with "Lightweight Fairing Additive 407" on the bare particleboard. Add enough 407 to get to the consistency of thick paint. This retains the benefits of the epoxy waterproofing, will fill the roughness of the particleboard and gives you a surface that can be reasonably easily sanded and then painted.

        Rob
        Thanks Rob
        As it is on the inside of the cabinet I am not worried about sanding that much.
        Steve steve&renee
        What an interesting idea. Maybe I will try both on some scrap wood and see. Is the Titebond III water based? Wondering how to thin it out.

        Thanks for the help
        Keith
        2018 Reflection 150 Series 220RK 5th wheel. Reese R20 Titan hitch, Steadyfast system, 2004 F350 King Ranch dually

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Yoda View Post
          Thanks Rob
          As it is on the inside of the cabinet I am not worried about sanding that much.
          Steve steve&renee
          What an interesting idea. Maybe I will try both on some scrap wood and see. Is the Titebond III water based? Wondering how to thin it out.

          Thanks for the help
          Keith
          Titebond cleans up with water, but leaves a residue that you can see after stain if you didn't paint the whole surface.

          In my experience, the Titebond III doesn't need to be thinned to "paint" with it. I just rolled it on.

          (Of course you know -- Cate&Rob is the Master at this kind of stuff. I'm just a Grasshopper.)

          Good luck.

          -Steve
          2018 Solitude 310GK, disc brakes
          Morryde CRE3000/XFactor with heavy duty shackles, V-Brackets in spring hangers
          2012 Ram 3500 SRW 6.7 Diesel, air bags
          18k B&W Companion, non-slider
          640 watts solar, 400 amp-hour Lion Safari UT 1300 battery bank
          Aims 1500 watt inverter/charger with ATS
          Blaine, MN

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by steve&renee View Post

            Titebond cleans up with water, but leaves a residue that you can see after stain if you didn't paint the whole surface.

            In my experience, the Titebond III doesn't need to be thinned to "paint" with it. I just rolled it on.

            (Of course you know -- Cate&Rob is the Master at this kind of stuff. I'm just a Grasshopper.)

            Good luck.

            -Steve
            I agree Rob is the Master Cate&Rob and if your the Grasshopper then that leaves me............. the fly on the wall???
            Back to my corner
            Keith


            PS if I am not around tomorrow evening, that means the barn cat Archie won.....taking him to the vet tomorrow. He goes ballistic every time I try to get him near a cage.
            2018 Reflection 150 Series 220RK 5th wheel. Reese R20 Titan hitch, Steadyfast system, 2004 F350 King Ranch dually

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