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1 GFCI circuit for all 12 GFCI outlets? GD BH2800 50A electrical service

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  • 1 GFCI circuit for all 12 GFCI outlets? GD BH2800 50A electrical service

    I don’t understand why my brand new BH2800 would only have one 15A GFCI circuit for the bathroom, living, kitchen, outdoor outlet, master bedroom, rear storage above the griddle and front storage compartment.

    12 120V outlets on 1 15A circuit and my RV is wired for 50A 240V?

    I can’t run any appliances if my wife is drying her hair in the bathroom. A 1875W hairdryer takes 15.62A so I have to turn off everything plugged into the other 11 outlets before she can dry her hair.

    Had anyone added additional breakers, wiring and GFCI outlets

    20A Bathroom
    20A Kitchen
    15A Outdoor
    15A Master bedroom/front storage
    2022 Imagine BH2800
    ProPride P3 hitch
    2013 Ford F-150 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost

  • #2
    jdfritz

    Your camper is wired for two 120v 50A lines, not 240V. (Yes...a 240V line is "split" to create the two 120V lines but for clarity the camper does not use 240V.)

    The wiring is (unfortunately) not unique. When I mapped my camper I found there is one breaker for almost all the outlets in the living area.

    To the specific question about rewiring, I can't remember a thread or post of anyone doing it. Access to some of the outlets will be difficult, if not impossible, since the "daisy chain" of wiring goes through laminated walls.

    Below is the "map" of my trailer as it came from GD for comparison.

    Click image for larger version

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    Forum moderators are not GD employees--we are volunteers and owners presumably just like yourself. Unless specifically mentioned otherwise, we have nothing to gain should you choose to purchase a product or engage a service we discuss on this forum.

    2017 Ford F-350 DRW, '19 315RLTSPlus

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    • #3
      The first consideration for adding circuits is . . . do you have open spots available in the panel? If not, you would have to add a sub-panel. All this is possible, but complex. It would be easier to add new circuits than to split existing ones.

      Rob
      Cate & Rob
      (with Border Collies Molly & Angel)
      2015 Reflection 303RLS
      2022 F350 Diesel CC SB SRW Lariat
      Bayham, Ontario, Canada

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      • #4
        Yes I have 6 open slots in the breaker panel. I may just add an additional 3 circuits. Thanks for the suggestion.
        2022 Imagine BH2800
        ProPride P3 hitch
        2013 Ford F-150 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost

        Comment


        • #5
          Just make sure that the added breakers are on the opposite leg of the 50 amp breaker, trust me I would have added it to the same side and still had the issue and spend hours trying to figure out why? (haha)

          Brian
          Brian & Michelle
          2018 Reflection 29RS Oct.2017 build date, EMS-HW50C , Lippert Remote
          2015 Chevy 3500HD CC LB Duramax , Reese Elite 18K

          Comment


          • #6
            IMHO your list includes several receptacles that do not require GFCI protection: master bedroom and living area being prime examples. If a receptacle is not in a potentially damp location (basement storage area) or within 6' (if memory of the NEC serves me correctly) of a water source, it does not need to be GFCI protected. Not questioning your statement, but something to consider going forward.
            John
            2018 Momentum 395M
            2018 Ram 3500 Dually
            Every day is a Saturday, but with no lawn to mow.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JBill9694 View Post
              IMHO your list includes several receptacles that do not require GFCI protection: master bedroom and living area being prime examples. If a receptacle is not in a potentially damp location (basement storage area) or within 6' (if memory of the NEC serves me correctly) of a water source, it does not need to be GFCI protected. Not questioning your statement, but something to consider going forward.
              And the RV industry doesn't follow NEC that closely anyway.

              GFCI are not required for bedrooms, HOWEVER, AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) breakers/outlets are.

              NEC GFCI protection for commonly used receptacle outlets in the specified areas of 210.8(A)(1) through (A)(11): Bathrooms, Garages and Accessory Buildings, Outdoors, Crawl Spaces, Basements, Kitchens, Sinks, Boathouses, Bathtubs and Shower Stalls, Laundry Areas, Indoor Damp and Wet Locations.
              Curtis, Christine, Cole, and Charlotte
              2007 Chevrolet Silverado Duramax LBZ, CCLB
              2020 Momentum 351M
              2004 Essex Vortex

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by OffToHavasu View Post

                And the RV industry doesn't follow NEC that closely anyway.

                GFCI are not required for bedrooms, HOWEVER, AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) breakers/outlets are.

                NEC GFCI protection for commonly used receptacle outlets in the specified areas of 210.8(A)(1) through (A)(11): Bathrooms, Garages and Accessory Buildings, Outdoors, Crawl Spaces, Basements, Kitchens, Sinks, Boathouses, Bathtubs and Shower Stalls, Laundry Areas, Indoor Damp and Wet Locations.
                Curtis,

                The RVIA specifies the adopted standards for recreational vehicles.
                For electrical requirements, they call out Article 551 of the 2020 National Electrical Code, not Article 210 (Branch Circuits). Article 551 covers recreational vehicles and RV parks. From what I've seen, the RV industry is in full compliance with Article 551.

                https://www.rvia.org/node/associatio...pted-standards

                Jim
                GDRV Forum Moderator
                GDRV SW USA Rally Support Coordinator

                Jim and Ginnie
                2017 Reflection 297RSTS

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TucsonJim View Post

                  Curtis,

                  The RVIA specifies the adopted standards for recreational vehicles.
                  For electrical requirements, they call out Article 551 of the 2020 National Electrical Code, not Article 210 (Branch Circuits). Article 551 covers recreational vehicles and RV parks. From what I've seen, the RV industry is in full compliance with Article 551.

                  https://www.rvia.org/node/associatio...pted-standards

                  Jim
                  Just off the top of my head, the subpanels are in violation.
                  Curtis, Christine, Cole, and Charlotte
                  2007 Chevrolet Silverado Duramax LBZ, CCLB
                  2020 Momentum 351M
                  2004 Essex Vortex

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Getting back to the OP, my point is that jdfritz may not need to add additional GFCI breakers or receptacles. It will depend on the order that the existing protected receptacles are connected to the existing GFCI receptacle. If all the dry location receptacles are after the last wet receptacle, then they could be connected back to a single breaker. If the dry receptacles are wired between wet receptacles, then the question becomes which is the best alternative; try to separate the dry receptacles from the wet, or just break the circuit at a convenient place and provide a new GFCI receptacle to protect all receptacles, wet and dry, downline from the break.
                    John
                    2018 Momentum 395M
                    2018 Ram 3500 Dually
                    Every day is a Saturday, but with no lawn to mow.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Howson, How did you go about mapping your RV electrical connections? I liked how organized you are with that. (Probably a dumb question, but it may be useful)

                      In my 2021 Imagine 2500RL, our TV outlets are on the Bath GFCI, (seems like all the outets are as well), and often don't know what blew the GFCI so we have to reset it.)
                      Since the TV is directly above the Power panel, it would be easy to add a separate breaker and wire that it seems.
                      2021 GD Imagine 2500RL with 600 watts of Solar added.
                      2017 GMC 2500 Duramax

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RockingKCranch View Post
                        Howson, How did you go about mapping your RV electrical connections? I liked how organized you are with that. (Probably a dumb question, but it may be useful)

                        In my 2021 Imagine 2500RL, our TV outlets are on the Bath GFCI, (seems like all the outets are as well), and often don't know what blew the GFCI so we have to reset it.)
                        Since the TV is directly above the Power panel, it would be easy to add a separate breaker and wire that it seems.
                        To figure out which outlet is powered by what breaker, a tester (available at any big box store) is an easy way to figure it out. Simply turn off a breaker and go around to all the outlets and test them. (Check ALL of them--as you can see by the diagram the layout is not logical, at least not to me.) The major appliances should correspond to their named breaker (air conditioner, microwave, water heater, etc) but still double-check that an outlet isn't affected. (The outlet in the bedroom under the closet is on the 315RLTS' water heater circuit--why, I don't know.)

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	tester.JPG Views:	0 Size:	24.1 KB ID:	89672

                        To make the drawing I used Photoshop. I'm no expert but after tinkering with the program for a few years I can do the basics fairly well.
                        Forum moderators are not GD employees--we are volunteers and owners presumably just like yourself. Unless specifically mentioned otherwise, we have nothing to gain should you choose to purchase a product or engage a service we discuss on this forum.

                        2017 Ford F-350 DRW, '19 315RLTSPlus

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My go to outlet tester is a non contact style. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Greenlee-No...tor/5005991289 The one I use most has a twist cap for on off (push button fluke died and non audible) and is easy to use since you are not fumbling around to get the thing aligned with all of the slots. Stab it in one, then the other.

                          I've also have varying luck with using it to locate wires in walls. If they are close to the paneling or sheetrock, it will signal the voltage.
                          Joseph
                          Tow
                          Vehicle: 2018 GMC K2500 Denali Diesel
                          Coach: 303RLS Delivered March 5, 2021
                          South of Houston Texas

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                          • #14
                            After tracing wires I found that the GFCI circuit is the blue romex. It first goes to the GFCI outlet in the bathroom.

                            #1 Bathroom GFCI
                            #2 Living room wall by sofa
                            #3 Bottom bunk bed
                            #4 Master bedroom TV
                            Disconnected blue romex from master bedroom TV outlet. For some reason there is only blue romex up to the first kitchen outlet and then white thereafter.

                            #5 2 Kitchen counter outlets
                            #6 Outside outlet under awning
                            Disconnected romex from #7 Master bedroom left side and it was long enough to pull it back to the breaker panel and installed 15A breaker and installed GFCI. Now #5 kitchen outlets and #6 outlet are on a new breaker.

                            #7 Master bedroom left side under linen closet
                            #8 Utility control panel
                            #9 Master bedroom right side under linen closet
                            #10 Front storage compartment right side then back across to drivers side and all the way back to
                            #11griddle/refrigerator storage compartment.
                            Ran a new 14/2 romex from the new 15A breaker in the electrical panel and installed GFCI outlet at #11 and it feeds outlets #7-10.
                            Last edited by jdfritz; 07-19-2022, 09:39 PM.
                            2022 Imagine BH2800
                            ProPride P3 hitch
                            2013 Ford F-150 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Breaker panel relabeled and moved breakers to the correct locations. The 50A main is a skinny breaker but the blank was pulled out during the factory install. Now I was able to fill those spots with a storage and kitchen GFCI circuits.
                              Attached Files
                              2022 Imagine BH2800
                              ProPride P3 hitch
                              2013 Ford F-150 4x4, 3.5 Ecoboost

                              Comment

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