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Tire Load or weight distribution per Original Configuration

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  • Tire Load or weight distribution per Original Configuration

    I was looking at the other post in reference to tire inflation pressures and found it very interesting that it varies according to the load. We are getting ready to tow and I am attempting to get the tire pressures where they need to be. When reading and researching it, I have found that the recommendation is to inflate the tire that will support the heaviest load to the recommended value and any other tires on the same axle, make them the same.

    That being said, is there any information out there which indicates the heavy tire based on the original camper configuration and distribution (a.k.a. Tire with the most load out of all four tires on both axles. P) Very simple solution for this would be to weigh on a scale per each tire but I do not have that capability. I can only do total weight of a cat scales.

    Thanks
    Tom Boucher
    2012 Ford F-350 DRW 4x4 6.7L Turbo Diesel Crew-cab “Bid Red aka Fat Bottom Girl”
    2014 Grand Design Reflection 323BHS “Big Phat Sally”

  • #2
    GDRV includes a weight sheet with each rig that will show the total weight and the weight from side to side. This sheet is also with an empty rig with no battery, propane or topped off hot water tank. Using this sheet will tell you how balanced the rig is but should not necessarily be used for tire inflation since the rig is unloaded. The question was asked of GDRV if using the tire inflation tables would be acceptable if moving to a higher load rated tire. We have not heard back which is understandable. For those that are using the original load rated tires that came with the rig, its best to follow the inflation listed on the yellow tag. The reason is that OEM tires are typically very close to their maximum load rating at maximum side wall pressures.
    For those that have moved up to a higher load rating, it makes no sense to inflate to the maximum side wall pressure since the load capability will be much higher than what is needed, and the suspension and contents of the rig will take a beating. Only when moving to a higher load rated tire should the inflation tables be used IMO.
    2017 Imagine 2600RB
    2015 GMC Sierra 4x4

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    • Big Red
      Big Red commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks. Gonna check it out.

  • #3
    Originally posted by Big Red View Post
    That being said, is there any information out there which indicates the heavy tire based on the original camper configuration and distribution?
    Not that I am aware of--the paperwork for a new trailer has weights but they are for the whole trailer, it's not by tire. Cate&Rob came up with a method you can use to measure the weight of each tire position in your driveway--hopefully he chimes in here with the details.

    Assuming your tires are OEM or match the OEM specifications, if in doubt run the pressure recommended on the trailer's data plate.

    What tires are on your 323? The original OEM Westlakes? Have you checked the date code on them?


    Howard & Francine +2 fur kids (Brody & Little Princess)
    2017 Ford F-350 DRW 6.7L Platinum & 2006 Honda Goldwing (in truck bed using a LoadAll v3)
    2019 315RLTS towed >11K miles as of Jul '19 (purchased 16 Jul 18 from Campers Inn RV in Byron, GA)

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    • Big Red
      Big Red commented
      Editing a comment
      Goodyear Endurance ST235/80R16. The other thread with the inflations caught my eye and I decided to dig a lil bit. Max load on em is 3420 which puts me 315 lbs shy of the GVWR.

  • #4
    Originally posted by howson View Post

    Cate&Rob came up with a method you can use to measure the weight of each tire position in your driveway--hopefully he chimes in here with the details.
    It is possible to weight each tire position using a Sherline 5th wheel pin weight scale. This involves removing each wheel, one at a time, and placing the hub on the Sherline scale. It is also possible to get these weights from the folks who do this at RV rallies . . . although I have seen some of that data that appears rather suspect (to me).

    I would go with the advice from Jim MidwestCamper in post 2. Use the trailer label pressures for OE size tires and follow the tire manufacturer's load/pressure tables only if upsizing to heavier tires.

    Rob
    Cate & Rob
    (with Border Collies Molly & Angel and their kitty Gracie)
    2015 Reflection 303RLS
    2014 Ecoboost F150 with Heavy Duty Payload Package
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada

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    • #5
      Thanks guys
      Tom Boucher
      2012 Ford F-350 DRW 4x4 6.7L Turbo Diesel Crew-cab “Bid Red aka Fat Bottom Girl”
      2014 Grand Design Reflection 323BHS “Big Phat Sally”

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