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Towing a Solitude 310GK

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  • Towing a Solitude 310GK

    Hello fellows, we recently purchased a 310GK and love the unit and are planning to take it south for the winter here from Alberta, I'm a bit concerned regarding the weight since it's about 2100 lbs heavier than my
    old Cardinal plus 300 lbs more pin weight, having said that according to my 2015 Silverado duramax SWD specs I have a bit of headroom since is "supposed" to tow 17.000 lbs and handle 3000 lbs box weight, I also have air bags installed...we took it for couple of short camping trips and the truck did well (if you don't mind looking at the fuel gauge lol!) but the terrain is mostly flat here in Alberta so I'm a little concerned if I'll have trouble with the hills trough some of the passes going south so I'll appreciate the opinion of the members that also own 3/4 tons trucks towing a similar 5th wheel.

    P.S. the 310 GK specs are UVWR 12.130 Lbs and pin weight is 2300 lbs unloaded.

    Thanks for your opinions,

    Adrian
    Edmonton,AB Canada

  • #2
    Adrian

    If you stay west or east of the mountains you will have better luck. If you go down thru West Virginia , Virginia you may struggle. There are quite a few long up hills as well as long down hills , steep also , that will give you trouble. A couple years ago we took or previous TT down to W.V. and the hills are pretty tough. Good luck.

    Brian
    Brian & Michelle
    2018 Reflection 29RS Oct.17 build date, EMS-HW50C , Lippert Remote
    2015 Chevy 3500HD CC LB Duramax , Reese Elite 18K

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    • #3
      The GVWR on that trailer is 15,000 lbs. If you are at that weight or close to it, you will be looking at approx. 3000 lbs of pin weight alone. Adding up the weight of your 5ver hitch, passenger(s), and anything and everything that goes in/on the truck, will give you an approx. weight that your truck will be carrying. Since no one but you knows how heavy or lite you will be loaded, you need to do some calculations and try to determine that approx number. My first step would be to check the driver side door post sticker that tells you the EXACT payload or carrying capacity of THAT TRUCK and do not go by any brochure or advertising numbers you may have seen. Keep in mind, that number on the sticker was the payload capacity of your truck the day it was built. If you've added things to the truck...a toolbox in the bed with tools, an aux.fuel tank, a bed cover, running boards...anything other than stock, you must deduct the weight of those items from the sticker number. If you are in doubt, take the truck to a scale with a full tank of fuel onboard and get a weight for the truck as it sits. Subtract that number from the GVWR of the truck (that number is on a sticker on the door post also), and that will be your payload capacity of the truck as it sits. Those numbers, should give you a pretty good idea of whether or not you have too much trailer for your truck. And, as you are probably already aware, the air bags do not increase payload capacity. In fact, they actually decrease your payload capacity by the amount of weight that they weigh....they are basically a device for leveling and many times the leveling is needed because the truck is overloaded.....not always, but many times
      If it ain't fast.....It ain't fun!

      Comment


      • #4
        Adrian, welcome to the forum. There's so much misinformation, misunderstanding and bad advice on the internet on this subject. I have been very "vocal" on it in the past but, after years and many 10s of thousands of towing miles, I have elected to stay out of the discussion. I used to try and keep track of how many folks I see towing trailers over what I would guarantee were overweight but the number became so unbelievable I have come to my own conclusion the question must be irrelevant in the real world.

        Anyway, to try and answer your question since you asked, the question YOU appear to be asking is regarding payload capacity. Your Duramax will haul the trailer up and down hills just fine. There is no difference between the drive train of a 3/4 ton and a 1 ton truck. I am fairly confident that your new 310 is pretty far over your payload capacity though. A 310 is likely close or over my 1 ton SRW payload capacity which is 3,569 lbs. Remember, your truck's payload capacity, as posted on the yellow sticker on the DS door jam, is total payload. So you need to subtract added weight including passengers, cargo and hitch before you see what you have left for pin weight! Plus, your 310s pin weight is likely to be between 3,100 and 3,300 lbs!

        All that said and based on what I have seen, if you're comfortable hauling it with your truck, you are among the average on the highways all over the country.

        FYI, the proper truck for a trailer that size is most likely a 1 ton DRW but I'm willing to bet the majority of trailers that size are towed by 3/4 ton SRW diesel trucks.

        JMHO
        Paul and Deb Cervone
        2015 337 RLS
        2016 GMC Denali 3500 SRW

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks folks for all your inputs, the numbers I have for my truck come from the owners manual and I double checked on GM's website and they match, I used to tow my old Cardinal FW about a foot shorter but by no means was a "light weight" coach but it didn't tax my truck at all , with this new trailer I can feel I'm pulling a heavier load but somehow it seems to "hug" the truck better also with the air bags set on the ride seems less "bumpy" and I'm keeping my speed around 60 mph otherwise a 36 gallons tank won't go too far specially if you are dealing with a headwind...

          I agree that these newer fivers offer way more room and amenities but the trade of is weight and the ideal towing vehicle will be a 1 ton with dual wheels but for me it's not a practical vehicle to drive around unless used mainly for towing which is not my case, also another draw back with the SRW is that I should be prepare to replace the rear tires quite often since they won't last long with this load.

          Anyway thanks again for all your comments and I'll keep in touch,

          Adrian

          2018 Solitude 310GK
          2015 Chevy 2500 LTZ diesel, stock



          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Adrian T. View Post
            Thanks folks for all your inputs, the numbers I have for my truck come from the owners manual and I double checked on GM's website and they match, I used to tow my old Cardinal FW about a foot shorter but by no means was a "light weight" coach but it didn't tax my truck at all , with this new trailer I can feel I'm pulling a heavier load but somehow it seems to "hug" the truck better also with the air bags set on the ride seems less "bumpy" and I'm keeping my speed around 60 mph otherwise a 36 gallons tank won't go too far specially if you are dealing with a headwind...

            I agree that these newer fivers offer way more room and amenities but the trade of is weight and the ideal towing vehicle will be a 1 ton with dual wheels but for me it's not a practical vehicle to drive around unless used mainly for towing which is not my case, also another draw back with the SRW is that I should be prepare to replace the rear tires quite often since they won't last long with this load.

            Anyway thanks again for all your comments and I'll keep in touch,

            Adrian

            2018 Solitude 310GK
            2015 Chevy 2500 LTZ diesel, stock


            Adrian.........as I stated above, you cannot use numbers from owners manuals and or brochures or websites for your payload numbers. The sticker on the driver side door post is the actual payload number for THAT truck. They put the very same owner's manual in every 3/4T truck, but that sticker on the door is specific to YOUR truck. You would being doing yourself a favor if you would check the payload number for your truck on the door sticker, otherwise, you are only taking generic numbers and those are totally not accurate.
            If it ain't fast.....It ain't fun!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Adrian T. View Post
              Thanks folks for all your inputs, the numbers I have for my truck come from the owners manual...
              Please take heed to Triplethreat 's comments. Look at your stickers!

              Click image for larger version

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              Howard & Francine +2 fur kids (Brody & Little Princess)
              2017 Ford F-350 DRW 6.7L Platinum & 2006 Honda Goldwing (in truck bed using a LoadAll v3)
              2019 315RLTS towed >11K miles as of Jul '19 (purchased 16 Jul 18 from Campers Inn RV in Byron, GA)

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks again guys,

                I did checked the sticker on my door and it shows GAWR of 10.000 lbs, now I may be wrong on this but somehow the manufacturers can't show anything higher otherwise will put the unit into a higher licencing category and even affect your insurance rates, also I think my truck total curb weight will be around 6.800 to 7.000 lbs without extras so optimistically I should be around the 3K payload rating...I checked the ratings of the 1 ton variation of my vintage year and you do gain around 550 lbs of extra payload on a SRW and of course that goes up drastically on a DRW even with the same drive train as mine, for the 2019's chevi's the duramax power was increased by 125 Lbs and I think they also beefed up the suspension and drive train for the 1 ton's but unfortunately I'm not in position to trade my truck so I guess I'll have to limited where I go with this trailer although the salesman checked when I purchased it and said "you will be fine" with your truck...famous last words....LOL!

                Appreciate your answers on this subject and I know it's very controversial to the least...

                Regards,

                Adrian

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Adrian T. View Post
                  Thanks again guys,

                  I did checked the sticker on my door and it shows GAWR of 10.000 lbs, now I may be wrong on this but somehow the manufacturers can't show anything higher otherwise will put the unit into a higher licencing category and even affect your insurance rates, also I think my truck total curb weight will be around 6.800 to 7.000 lbs without extras so optimistically I should be around the 3K payload rating...I checked the ratings of the 1 ton variation of my vintage year and you do gain around 550 lbs of extra payload on a SRW and of course that goes up drastically on a DRW even with the same drive train as mine, for the 2019's chevi's the duramax power was increased by 125 Lbs and I think they also beefed up the suspension and drive train for the 1 ton's but unfortunately I'm not in position to trade my truck so I guess I'll have to limited where I go with this trailer although the salesman checked when I purchased it and said "you will be fine" with your truck...famous last words....LOL!

                  Appreciate your answers on this subject and I know it's very controversial to the least...

                  Regards,

                  Adrian
                  Adrian, you are confusing the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) with what your actual payload number is. GVWR minus the weight of the truck is your payload number. When the truck was built, a sticker was asked to the driver side door post. The sticker you should be looking at is a white sticker with Yellow highlighted areas on it. One of those areas will tell you the payload /Cargo Carrying Capacity....or CCC ). That is the number you should be concerned with finding in order to know your payload capacity of your truck. Anything that has been added to the truck since the day it was built will lower that payload number by however much the item(s) weigh....example...a truckbed toolbox, tools, bed cover, etc
                  If it ain't fast.....It ain't fun!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Adrian T. - Here's how to find out what your actual payload is. In Howson's picture above there is a yellow label. That label has a line that says..combined weight of occupants, etc should not exceed: xxxx lbs.

                    That number is different for every truck. Check yours, then subtract the weight of your fuel, yourself, any passengers, pets, tools, etc. That number is your permitted pin weight or payload that is left. There is no doubt that your 310GK will be over your payload number.

                    OTOH, many people, including myself do it successfully every day. The only difference between a 3/4 ton and a 1 ton is an extra leaf spring. You can compensate for that spring with airbags but that will not change the fact that you are over payload. It will make your truck level while towing.

                    So the bottom line is that it is up to you. It is not optimal but it is possible.
                    Last edited by JeffC; 10-07-2019, 08:11 PM.
                    2017 310GK

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