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Weight Distribution placement

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  • Weight Distribution placement

    Hey folks, I'm a brand new owner of a 2250RK and having fun trying to solve weight distribution puzzle. Apologies if this has already been answered. If so, can you place a link to the thread or external links to sites?

    I'm looking for a "cheat sheet" that describes how weight is distributed (as a pct) the further away from axles weight is placed. I've seen some general references. the most general example is to load 60/40. Load 60% of weight towards the front. Which is ok for ball parking numbers. But I'm hoping to find (or create?) something a little more specific because I believe the further the weight is from the axles the more it increases/decreases tongue weight. I think a reference sheet like this would be useful for trip planning.

    Example (using my 2250RK):
    Jack/Propane = 90% hitch/10% axle;
    Batteries = 80% hitch/20% axle;
    Front storage = 70% hitch/30% on axle;
    Fresh Water Tank = ???
    Bathroom = ??
    Kitchen = ??

    2014 GMC 1500 Crew SLT Z71 - 5.3l
    1494 Payload - 9500 Tow Capacity - 1200 Max Tongue Weight
    2021 Imagine 2250RK

  • #2
    We need a Loadmaster to chime in here on how it's done to figure the CoG on a USAF cargo aircraft.

    Not what you're asking...but since you identified as a newbie, the two key weights to focus on (related to the trailer) are total trailer weight (< or = the GVWR rating) and tongue weight as a %. Lots and lots of discussion on this forum on those topics. If you need help finding them, reply back.

    Howard
    Forum moderators are not GD employees--we are volunteers and owners presumably just like yourself. Unless specifically mentioned otherwise, we have nothing to gain should you choose to purchase a product or engage a service we discuss on this forum.

    Howard, 2017 Ford F-350 DRW, '19 315RLTSPlus

    Comment


    • #3
      2250RK best advice I can give you is get a tongue weight scale. Then you can see the difference moving things around the trailer makes as well as filling your tanks. You want to shoot for 13-15% of the total trailer weight on the tongue to minimize sway.

      Sherline LM 2000 - Trailer Tongue Weight Scale 2000lb https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007REK28M...VDAD13EGHF9NXM

      Also I might suggest a better forum name rather than your trailer model. One of the moderators can help you change your name if you want.
      Neil Citro
      2018 Reflection 28bh
      2019 F350 6.7L Long Bed Crew Cab

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 2250RK View Post
        Hey folks, I'm a brand new owner of a 2250RK and having fun trying to solve weight distribution puzzle. Apologies if this has already been answered. If so, can you place a link to the thread or external links to sites?

        I'm looking for a "cheat sheet" that describes how weight is distributed (as a pct) the further away from axles weight is placed. I've seen some general references. the most general example is to load 60/40. Load 60% of weight towards the front. Which is ok for ball parking numbers. But I'm hoping to find (or create?) something a little more specific because I believe the further the weight is from the axles the more it increases/decreases tongue weight. I think a reference sheet like this would be useful for trip planning.

        Example (using my 2250RK):
        Jack/Propane = 90% hitch/10% axle;
        Batteries = 80% hitch/20% axle;
        Front storage = 70% hitch/30% on axle;
        Fresh Water Tank = ???
        Bathroom = ??
        Kitchen = ??
        I'm not following the percentages you listed. The best bet is to look for your tongue weight as a percentage of the trailers GVW (your loaded weight). If you are in the 10%-15% range you will be good. Some have complained of light tongue weights with RK models so you may need to load more forward to offset the rear mass, depending on whats stowed there. Road tests (many in my case) will allow you time to make further adjustments toward final tuning.

        Jim
        2017 Imagine 2600RB
        2015 GMC Sierra 4x4

        Comment


        • #5
          2250RK

          I tried to play with this in our previous TT , bunkhouse model and 3 kids. When we would pack for the weekend the kids would pile all of their stuff in the back on the bunks , did not go well when daddy was trying to get the proper weight distribution set up. Once I got the hang of things and learned where to place stuff in the camper I did get it pretty close most of the time , other times I was stopping along the road and making an adjustment to the chains on my older weight set up. It also depended on how long we were going and if I was hauling water. I did not have a tongue scale back then , still don't , but got along just fine. Today with a tongue scale it would be fairly easy to get a constant tongue weight so that on the road adjustments would not be required. Another thing to think of is when you go camping you probably will weigh more than when you return so the set up will change with that. There are weights and balance calculators for airplanes but I never even went that far.

          Brian
          Brian & Michelle
          2018 Reflection 29RS Oct.17 build date, EMS-HW50C , Lippert Remote
          2015 Chevy 3500HD CC LB Duramax , Reese Elite 18K

          Comment


          • #6
            2250RK I like the use of your percentages fore and aft. As an example, I did the same type of exercise just for the heck of it and this is what I came up with for our 2600RB. For convenience sake I used the distance from the equalizer between the 2 axels to both the front and back. It just happens that those distances are about 20 feet from center to ball and 10 feet from center to rear of unit at spare tire, those distances are not exact but good enough for an exercise but are in no way a substitute for actual weights at a scale. Each foot from the ball happens to equal 5% change in weight distribution from hitch to axels. Behind the axels that 5% remains the same per foot, I.E. the 50 lbs of water in the water heater at the rear of the unit ( -10 feet) removes about 25 lbs. from the tongue. For your unit measure center to front and center to rear and break it down as you like for %. Your original numbers look close to me but to be more accurate you can go online and look up aircraft "weight and balance" as taught to new pilots. In that stuff they get into moments etc. and a calculation that can be adjusted for actual distances and shifts in center of gravity (CoG). With the right beginning info on tongue weight ( from your factory weight sheet) you can have an IDEA of what is going on weight wise. Never trust those figures without having actual loaded weights at a scale.

            Dave
            flyfshrockies, 2021 imagine 2600RB, Ford F-150, XLT supper crew 3.5 eco boost with max tow. Dave and Toni (and the awesome Aussie Bayley, he's the social one)

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow! this is all great info. Many thanks for all the quick replies.

              I will definitely invest in a TW scale.
              2014 GMC 1500 Crew SLT Z71 - 5.3l
              1494 Payload - 9500 Tow Capacity - 1200 Max Tongue Weight
              2021 Imagine 2250RK

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by flyfshrockies View Post
                2250RK I like the use of your percentages fore and aft. As an example, I did the same type of exercise just for the heck of it and this is what I came up with for our 2600RB. For convenience sake I used the distance from the equalizer between the 2 axels to both the front and back. It just happens that those distances are about 20 feet from center to ball and 10 feet from center to rear of unit at spare tire, those distances are not exact but good enough for an exercise but are in no way a substitute for actual weights at a scale. Each foot from the ball happens to equal 5% change in weight distribution from hitch to axels. Behind the axels that 5% remains the same per foot, I.E. the 50 lbs of water in the water heater at the rear of the unit ( -10 feet) removes about 25 lbs. from the tongue. For your unit measure center to front and center to rear and break it down as you like for %. Your original numbers look close to me but to be more accurate you can go online and look up aircraft "weight and balance" as taught to new pilots. In that stuff they get into moments etc. and a calculation that can be adjusted for actual distances and shifts in center of gravity (CoG). With the right beginning info on tongue weight ( from your factory weight sheet) you can have an IDEA of what is going on weight wise. Never trust those figures without having actual loaded weights at a scale.

                Dave
                This is great Dave! Many many thanks! Yeah, my percentages were "back of the envelope" calculations when I measured distance between axles and front. I do plan on getting a TW scale after reading these replies and taking measurements with weight in different locations. I'm hoping this type of info can be used as a planning/forecasting tool. Most of my trips will be weekend warrior trips so once I figure out that load it will be pretty easy. However, I do want to play around in a spreadsheet with different trip scenarios.

                Thanks again!
                2014 GMC 1500 Crew SLT Z71 - 5.3l
                1494 Payload - 9500 Tow Capacity - 1200 Max Tongue Weight
                2021 Imagine 2250RK

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Country Campers View Post
                  2250RK

                  I tried to play with this in our previous TT , bunkhouse model and 3 kids. When we would pack for the weekend the kids would pile all of their stuff in the back on the bunks , did not go well when daddy was trying to get the proper weight distribution set up. Once I got the hang of things and learned where to place stuff in the camper I did get it pretty close most of the time , other times I was stopping along the road and making an adjustment to the chains on my older weight set up. It also depended on how long we were going and if I was hauling water. I did not have a tongue scale back then , still don't , but got along just fine. Today with a tongue scale it would be fairly easy to get a constant tongue weight so that on the road adjustments would not be required. Another thing to think of is when you go camping you probably will weigh more than when you return so the set up will change with that. There are weights and balance calculators for airplanes but I never even went that far.

                  Brian
                  There is something positive to state about those old style chain or new style strap systems in being able to adjust on the fly.

                  Jim
                  Last edited by MidwestCamper; 04-08-2021, 12:16 PM.
                  2017 Imagine 2600RB
                  2015 GMC Sierra 4x4

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    2250RK MidwestCamper I am just getting started with the strap system on my Blue OX. It seems that with a long enough socket wrench it will be much easier to adjust bar tension on the fly to suit , load, road and weather conditions. It does take a LOT of wrench to adjust tension without lifting the tongue somewhat. That unassisted amount of pressure may not be great for the strap system. We are leaving on our usual 2,500 mile round robin trip next month and will have ample opportunity to try various settings and processes.

                    Dave
                    flyfshrockies, 2021 imagine 2600RB, Ford F-150, XLT supper crew 3.5 eco boost with max tow. Dave and Toni (and the awesome Aussie Bayley, he's the social one)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      PDF of First Draft. This is a rough guestimate using simple calculations. I still need to purchase a TW scale to see how close the numbers are. Not an exact science but it's a start. I dig more into the science if my numbers are way off. Fun little project though.


                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by 2250RK; 04-08-2021, 04:14 PM.
                      2014 GMC 1500 Crew SLT Z71 - 5.3l
                      1494 Payload - 9500 Tow Capacity - 1200 Max Tongue Weight
                      2021 Imagine 2250RK

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 2250RK View Post
                        PDF of First Draft. This is a rough guestimate using simple calculations. I still need to purchase a TW scale to see how close the numbers are. Not an exact science but it's a start. I dig more into the science if my numbers are way off. Fun little project though.


                        One thing I see missing from your calculations is the WD hitch. This needs to be counted toward your TV's payload. I would assume 2 adults and minimal gear plus a WD hitch would put you over your estimated payload numbers in your chart...

                        Also, update your signature so we can see what your tow vehicle is....
                        Jeff and Debbie
                        2021 Imagine 2250RK
                        2015 Ram 2500 6.7 CTD Crew Cab Short Bed Factory Air-Ride Auto Level
                        USMC Veteran

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          2250RK Looks like you are on the right path. What you are basically looking at is a giant torque wrench (engineering term is a moment balance equation). I suggest using positive and negative values for your distances. Remember to carry your units through so it makes sense at the end. Weight * distance is moment (or torque). By summing up the values, the difference will be in lb * in (assuming you are staying with what's in the sheets). Divide this by the center of axle to ball or jack and this should be the load left (lb * in divided by in equals lb).

                          I deal with explaining all this to newbies at work. It's an old fashioned teeter totter. The ball side needs to be heavier by 10 -15% so it keeps that side down.
                          Tow Vehicle: 2018 GMC K2500 Denali Diesel
                          Coach: 303RLS Delivered March 5, 2021

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Let me add another dimension in there for you....one side of my trailer is 500# heavier than the other side.....
                            Momentum 21G

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I’m not seeing any way to add a signature in the profile or user settings. I have a ‘14 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew - 4x4 - Z71 - 5.3l - 4.3. I’m pretty sure this RV is at the max of what I can tow.
                              2014 GMC 1500 Crew SLT Z71 - 5.3l
                              1494 Payload - 9500 Tow Capacity - 1200 Max Tongue Weight
                              2021 Imagine 2250RK

                              Comment

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