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If you're thinking about TPMS

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  • If you're thinking about TPMS

    For those of you who are considering adding TPMS to your trailer but are still on the fence: I left Reno Thursday morning for a 450 mile trip to Red Rock Canyon, a few miles west of Las Vegas. Before I left, I checked my tire pressure, as I always do before a trip and topped them off at 65 lbs. I check my TPMS often when I’m traveling, and, especially in 90 degree temps, the tire pressure usually rises to about 70 lbs. About 100 miles from my destination, I looked up at the monitor and saw that the rear tire on the curb side was 65 lbs when the other three were at 70 lbs. I drove another ½ hour and checked again – down to 63 lbs. I didn’t want to change a tire on the side of Rt 95 (if you’ve traveled it, you know what I’m talking about). I kept an eye out, and when it got down to 60 lbs, about 30 minutes away, I stopped and pumped it back up to 70 lbs. That got me to the campground, ending up with 65 lbs. in the tire. I changed it, and found a little tiny serrated nail in the tread. I’m sure it can be repaired, so I’m not too concerned about it – just picked it up somewhere along the way.

    My point is, if you’re thinking about TPMS, don’t put if off. Without it, I imagine I would have risked a blow out or complete tire failure before I got to the campground. Also, MAKE SURE you have the proper equipment to change a tire if you need to; the correct sized deep well sockets (the spare tire nuts are a different size than the lug nuts), a breaker bar of some kind, a torque wrench capable of 120 lbs, and some type of jacking system (I carry an 8 ton bottle jack). It only took me about 20 minutes, but if I hadn’t had the equipment, I would have had to pay someone to come out and change it for me.

  • #2
    Glad the TPMS did it's job and you made it safely to the campsite. And I second the recommendation to install a TPMS system.
    Last year with a trailer with no TPMS I had a tire come apart on me. It may have had a slow leak like yours. As it was, it blew apart and wrapped around the brake backing plate. TIGHT. I couldn't get it out. And, as I found out, you can't cut steel cords with sidecutters. So I tied the remaining 'petals' of the blown tire to the axle and removed the bare rim. Put the spare on and limped home for 40 miles at about 20mph because the old bits of tire were still rubbing on the spare sidewall..
    If I had TPMS it would likely have been a much less eventful day

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by thawkins57 View Post
      For those of you who are considering adding TPMS to your trailer but are still on the fence: I left Reno Thursday morning for a 450 mile trip to Red Rock Canyon, a few miles west of Las Vegas. Before I left, I checked my tire pressure, as I always do before a trip and topped them off at 65 lbs. I check my TPMS often when I’m traveling, and, especially in 90 degree temps, the tire pressure usually rises to about 70 lbs. About 100 miles from my destination, I looked up at the monitor and saw that the rear tire on the curb side was 65 lbs when the other three were at 70 lbs. I drove another ½ hour and checked again – down to 63 lbs. I didn’t want to change a tire on the side of Rt 95 (if you’ve traveled it, you know what I’m talking about). I kept an eye out, and when it got down to 60 lbs, about 30 minutes away, I stopped and pumped it back up to 70 lbs. That got me to the campground, ending up with 65 lbs. in the tire. I changed it, and found a little tiny serrated nail in the tread. I’m sure it can be repaired, so I’m not too concerned about it – just picked it up somewhere along the way.

      My point is, if you’re thinking about TPMS, don’t put if off. Without it, I imagine I would have risked a blow out or complete tire failure before I got to the campground. Also, MAKE SURE you have the proper equipment to change a tire if you need to; the correct sized deep well sockets (the spare tire nuts are a different size than the lug nuts), a breaker bar of some kind, a torque wrench capable of 120 lbs, and some type of jacking system (I carry an 8 ton bottle jack). It only took me about 20 minutes, but if I hadn’t had the equipment, I would have had to pay someone to come out and change it for me.
      Excellent advice--thanks for the post!

      Howard
      Forum moderators are not GD employees--we are volunteers and owners presumably just like yourself. Unless specifically mentioned otherwise, we have nothing to gain should you choose to purchase a product or engage a service we discuss on this forum.

      Howard, 2017 Ford F-350 DRW, '19 315RLTSPlus

      Comment


      • #4
        I've read that you need to have metal valve stems on your tires to support the extra weight of the TPMS sensors, and that rubber ones cannot support them. Is that true?

        Thanks!
        2019 Imagine 2400bh
        2019 f150 XLT Crew, 6.5' box, 3.55 ratio

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by StephenO View Post
          I've read that you need to have metal valve stems on your tires to support the extra weight of the TPMS sensors, and that rubber ones cannot support them. Is that true?

          Thanks!
          I believe Cate&Rob Rob indicated he was running rubber valve stems without issue, Hopefully he will chime in an correct me if i am wrong.
          Keith
          2018 Reflection 150 Series 220RK 5th wheel. Reese R20 Titan hitch, Steadyfast system, 2004 F350 King Ranch dually

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by StephenO View Post
            I've read that you need to have metal valve stems on your tires to support the extra weight of the TPMS sensors, and that rubber ones cannot support them. Is that true?

            Thanks!
            See this related discussion. https://gdrvowners.com/forum/operati...alancing-tires. I have run TireMinder sensors on OE rubber stems for years (which is OK with TireMinder) My perspective in posts 9 and 13 of that thread. The manufacturer of larger heavier “flow through” sensors requires metal stems. I have read reports of a number of quality and installation problems with aftermarket metal stems.

            Rob
            Cate & Rob
            (with Border Collies Molly & Angel and their kitty Gracie)
            2015 Reflection 303RLS
            2014 Ecoboost F150 with Heavy Duty Payload Package
            Aylmer, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              I've also been running my TireMinders with rubber stems for 3 seasons now - no problems...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by thawkins57 View Post
                For those of you who are considering adding TPMS to your trailer but are still on the fence: I left Reno Thursday morning for a 450 mile trip to Red Rock Canyon, a few miles west of Las Vegas. Before I left, I checked my tire pressure, as I always do before a trip and topped them off at 65 lbs. I check my TPMS often when I’m traveling, and, especially in 90 degree temps, the tire pressure usually rises to about 70 lbs. About 100 miles from my destination, I looked up at the monitor and saw that the rear tire on the curb side was 65 lbs when the other three were at 70 lbs. I drove another ½ hour and checked again – down to 63 lbs. I didn’t want to change a tire on the side of Rt 95 (if you’ve traveled it, you know what I’m talking about). I kept an eye out, and when it got down to 60 lbs, about 30 minutes away, I stopped and pumped it back up to 70 lbs. That got me to the campground, ending up with 65 lbs. in the tire. I changed it, and found a little tiny serrated nail in the tread. I’m sure it can be repaired, so I’m not too concerned about it – just picked it up somewhere along the way.

                My point is, if you’re thinking about TPMS, don’t put if off. Without it, I imagine I would have risked a blow out or complete tire failure before I got to the campground. Also, MAKE SURE you have the proper equipment to change a tire if you need to; the correct sized deep well sockets (the spare tire nuts are a different size than the lug nuts), a breaker bar of some kind, a torque wrench capable of 120 lbs, and some type of jacking system (I carry an 8 ton bottle jack). It only took me about 20 minutes, but if I hadn’t had the equipment, I would have had to pay someone to come out and change it for me.
                THANK YOU. my TST 507 via Amazon, will be here Tuesday.

                Dave and Sue
                2020 GD 2250RK
                2019 F-150 XLT, 5.0, 4WD, SB
                Curt 17500 WDH, 3.55
                GY Endurance, Dexter EZ Flex
                SCPO(SW) USN, (Ret), HP: Tampa Bay ⚓️🇺🇸

                Comment


                • #9
                  Before I left, I checked my tire pressure, as I always do before a trip and topped them off at 65 lbs.

                  what trailer do you have that your running 65 lbs in tires?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chuck48 View Post
                    Before I left, I checked my tire pressure, as I always do before a trip and topped them off at 65 lbs.

                    what trailer do you have that your running 65 lbs in tires?
                    I have a 2018 Imagine 2250RK with 205/75-15 tires.

                    Comment

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